The Vicar’s Sermon “Teasers”

Pastoral Care Provider:  Vicar Jeremiah T. Heydt

Each week a compilation of the upcoming weeks’ readings is completed as a reference and review.  I hope that you find this information helpful in deepening your spiritual understanding and growth.

A synopsis of the readings for the coming Sunday, what happened in church last week, any other notable events and a Commemoration of the Church

Sunday, February 3, 2019 is the 4th Sunday of Epiphany

In the 1 Corinthians 13:1-13, Christians in Corinth prided themselves on their spiritual gifts. Paul reminds them that God gives us many gifts through the Holy Spirit, but the purpose behind all of them is love, the kind of love that God showed us in Jesus Christ… and in the Gospel of Luke, chapter 4:21-30, People in Jesus’ hometown are initially pleased when he says that God will free the oppressed. Their pleasure turns to rage when he reminds them that God’s prophetic mission typically pushes beyond human boundaries so that mercy and healing are extended to those regarded as outsiders. Here is part of the message: God tells us that ‘love looks like something.’ Love is not just a feeling or a romantic notion of some sort. It looks like something. Love looks like something. Jesus came and revealed Himself as Messiah – love looks like something. Love in action sacrifices self for others – see there on the Cross, the Son of God bruised, bleeding and dying – because love looks like something. Love forgives and doesn’t hold grudges. Hear love as it cries out, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do” – because love looks like something. See love endure and suffer all things as the Father turns away – “My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me,” – Yes, love looks like something. See love sacrifice all for the beloved; see Him die – for you, for me – because love looks like something. And beloved, look the grave is empty – Jesus rose – because the power of love looks like something. By simply believing in what Jesus did for us on the Cross and in his Resurrection God forgives us and makes us his children. Do you believe this? – Yes?

Jeremiah 1:4-10: God calls Jeremiah to be a prophet and consecrates him in the womb. Jeremiah’s task is to preach God’s word in the midst of the difficult political realities of his time, before the Babylonian exile. He is to make God known not only to Judah, but also to the nations.

Psalm 71:1-6: From my mother’s womb you have been my strength. (Ps. 71:6) 

1 Corinthians 13:1-13:  Christians in Corinth prided themselves on their spiritual gifts. Paul reminds them that God gives us many gifts through the Holy Spirit, but the purpose behind all of them is love, the kind of love that God showed us in Jesus Christ.

Luke 4:21-30: People in Jesus’ hometown are initially pleased when he says that God will free the oppressed. Their pleasure turns to rage when he reminds them that God’s prophetic mission typically pushes beyond human boundaries so that mercy and healing are extended to those regarded as outsiders.

Called to Domestic Disturbance

Jesus reads from the scriptures and is the talk of the town. At first, Jesus is seen as the hometown boy made good. Then something changes. Is it the mention of Jesus being the son of a local carpenter, Joseph? Does Jesus sense that people are proud of his learning but less eager to engage in his teachings? Is it that people’s expectations are raised—but now Jesus tells them that “no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown”? Jesus angers the crowd and is driven to a cliff and probable death. What does it mean for this hometown boy to create a domestic, and more to the point, a holy disturbance? God’s vision is certainly a challenge, and now Jesus, with the words of the prophets, is unleashing a disturbance in the domestic, tamed, controlled ways of the world and its powers. In the first lesson for today, Jeremiah recognizes the challenge of speaking a prophetic word and questions whether he is too young to take on God’s commission. Jesus steps into his role and finds challenge among his home community and those who have known him his whole life. In a strange twist, Jesus walks through this challenging crowd to safety.

Today, echoing Jeremiah and the psalmist, we sense a call or mission, even in the midst of dangers or among those who would do harm. Jesus and Jeremiah become key illustrations and open conversation of how we are formed, equipped, and called to live God’s agape love, even when surrounded by challenges, obstacles, or hostility. Where is God calling us? How must we confront our own or the community’s barriers? What prophetic word are we being called to speak that might cause a holy disturbance?

Prayer of the Day

Almighty and ever-living God, increase in us the gifts of faith, hope, and love; and that we may obtain what you promise, make us love what you command, through your Son, Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.

What Happened In Church Last Week

“Today” is mentioned in Luke, how many times?

Coming Up:

SOUPer Bowl, this Sunday, February 3, 2019…..bring cans of soup to contribute to Friend, Inc……or $$$$$$$

SCOUT SUNDAY…..they have a short program, they are the greeters and ushers

The Church Commemorates

The Martyrs of Japan, died 1597

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Christianity was brought to Japan in the sixteenth century by Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries. The religion was suppressed, however, and in 1597 twenty-six missionaries and converts were crucified. Nevertheless, Christianity survived and later prospered.

See You In Church This Sunday !!!!!! The Lord Be With You

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